Beeswax Candles

November 15, 2013

beeswax candles

I like lighting candles around the house, especially in the winter months, but I'm really sensitive to the perfumes and toxic ingredients that are in most of the candles found at the store. That's why I decided to learn how to make beeswax candles this year, and, surprisingly, it's a lot easier than I thought.

Aside from the raw coolness factor that comes from watching the liquid wax solidify - something that always intrigued me as a kid - I like making these candles at home because I can scent them however I want with essential oils. Mostly I'll just leave them plain because the beeswax (usually) smells nice enough on its own, but sometimes it's fun to add something extra.

beeswax candles

Simple Beeswax Candles

Materials:
Water
A medium saucepan
1 4-cup measuring glass
Beeswax (in pellet or block form)
Essential oils (optional)
Small glass jars or candle molds, clean and dry
Cotton candle wicks
Skewers or chopsticks

Instructions:

1. Prepare all of your ingredients. If your beeswax is in block form, cut it into cubes for faster melting.

2. Pour water into your saucepan until it is 2 inches high, and place on the stove over medium heat.

3. Place beeswax cubes or pellets into 4-cup measuring glass. Then place measuring glass in saucepan until the beeswax has completely melted.

4. Once beeswax melts, carefully remove measuring glass from saucepan, and place on towel-lined counter top. Add 50-100 drops of essential oil, or until you're happy with the strength of the scent (optional).

5. While still in liquid form, pour the beeswax into your small jars, making sure to leave at least 1/2-inch headspace.

beeswax candles

6. Place one wick in each jar, centering it as best as possible. Use chopsticks or wooden skewers to hold the wicks in place until the wax has dried.

7. Once the wax has dried completely, snip the tops of your wicks to about 1" height.

beeswax candles

8. Light wicks, and enjoy!

(P.S. These also make really great gifts for the holidays!)

13 comments:

  1. These are awesome! We tried making candles last year, and they turned out great, but the tops were so much more lumpy than yours! How did you get the top of the candle so smooth?

    http://thriftarchives.blogspot.com/

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    1. @kimberly: I just made sure to pour the wax in the jar an set the wicks ASAP. After that, I tried not to touch them at all until the wax was hard. The places where they do lump up and crack don't bother me, though. I like the handmade look. :)

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  2. They look great! You're right, a great gift for the holidays...that goes on my gift list for this year I think!

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  3. ooh I've been meaning to do this! Need to get me to the beekeepers' shop. I was wondering - would you be so nice as to share those tags/labels? They're really nice :)

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    1. @Sera: you can find the tags and labels from myownlabels.com. They're the chalkboard style - my favorite. :)

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  4. I would like to try these beeswax candles! Looks so pretty. I remember we did candles at home with my dad (as a gift for my mom) when we were kids, the wax started burning in the kitchen! Just need to be careful hehe :)

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  5. I have wanted to make candles but always thought they would be a big pain...love that your instructions make it all so 'not' scary, thanks. xo

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  6. They look so pretty in their jars! I also can't have anything with synthetic fragrance. I often buy candles from a lady at our market who makes essential oil ones, but I really should just make my own!

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  7. Can you recommend any source/how to find a good source for the beeswax and wicks?

    P.S. These look great; nice use of those weirdly-dimensioned ikea liners, too!

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  8. Hey Berit. I think the best place to buy beeswax is locally, which will obviously vary depending on where you live. Other than that, there's always Amazon. :)

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  9. Not really any new or helpful info here for me, but thank you for taking the time to answer here.

    Happy Holidays!

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  10. Is it necessary to put coconut oil in with the beeswax? I've seen other recipes and they call for that.

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  11. Is it necessary to put coconut oil in with the beeswax? I've seen other recipes and they call for that.

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